2018-10-05 / Front Page

Electronic warfare Soldiers officially become cyber warriors

Capt. James Williams III
Cyber Center of Excellence Public Affairs


Maj. Gen. John B. Morrison Jr., commander of the Cyber Center of Excellence, and Brig. Gen. Neil S. Hersey, commandant of the Cyber School, pose with electronic warfare staff in commemoration of electronic Warfare becoming an operational branch within the Cyber Corps. Capt. James Williams III / Cyber Center of Excellence Public Affairs Maj. Gen. John B. Morrison Jr., commander of the Cyber Center of Excellence, and Brig. Gen. Neil S. Hersey, commandant of the Cyber School, pose with electronic warfare staff in commemoration of electronic Warfare becoming an operational branch within the Cyber Corps. Capt. James Williams III / Cyber Center of Excellence Public Affairs Back in 2010, the Army decided to make electronic warfare an official functional branch due to the lessons learned while fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The need to grow EW, which was previously only a skill identifier that a soldier could earn upon completion of a six week course, was realized during the army’s efforts to counter enemy improvised explosive devices.

At the time, the new branch was most effectively aligned with fires and effects, so it made perfect sense for EW to train with field artillery and on the battlefield integrate with fires coordinators at the varying levels of command.

Fast forward to today; threats in the electromagnetic spectrum have significantly increased since counter IED operations were the main focus. In kind, the Army has decided to drastically expand EW personnel and capability which has led to the realignment of EW with the Army Cyber Corps.

“The incorporation of cyber and electronic warfare is absolutely the right move for the Army – a move toward a fully integrated force that is educated, trained and equipped for multi-domain competition,” said Brig. Gen. Neil S. Hersey, commandant of the U.S. Army Cyber School.

The nation is constantly engaged in cyber operations which includes a significant presence in the electromagnetic spectrum. In fact, cyber and EW are so intertwined that the Army created the acronym CEMA (Cyber Electromagnetic Activity) as a means to describe it.

“As we field new integrated CEMA capability throughout the Army, we can harness the lethality of both the cyber and electronic warfare disciplines – we will continue to evolve together to compete in this new information environment,” said Hersey.

Oct. 1 was the official date that EW Soldiers became cyber warriors.

“The marriage of the electronic warfare functional area and the Cyber branch demonstrates the Army’s recognition of complementary capabilities that, along with signals intelligence, will give a more complete set of options for commanders to maneuver in the electromagnetic spectrum,” said Col. Mark L. Dotson, Training and Doctrine Capabilities manager for EW.

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