2018-03-02 / Front Page

Yoga has benefits for mom, baby

Laura Levering
Fort Gordon Public Affairs Office


Kim Bridi, yoga therapist, Evans Yoga Room, guides Latasha Britton through a stretch during a prenatal yoga class at the Family Outreach Center. 
Laura Levering / Fort Gordon Public Affairs Office Kim Bridi, yoga therapist, Evans Yoga Room, guides Latasha Britton through a stretch during a prenatal yoga class at the Family Outreach Center. Laura Levering / Fort Gordon Public Affairs Office As a woman’s body and mind changes during and after pregnancy, so do her physical and mental needs. Fort Gordon’s New Parent Support Program offers an array of classes and services to address those changes and needs.

When practiced safely, mother and baby can benefit from prenatal yoga. Physically, it can help mothers stay in shape throughout pregnancy, which can ultimately lead to a less stressful birthing process and smoother recovery. Mentally, it can bring a woman closer to her baby while increasing awareness of her body.

“It gives them trust in their body, which a lot of times can be lost throughout the pregnancy process for various reasons,” said Kim Bridi, yoga therapist, Evans Yoga Room. “It kind of takes away your power, and so this helps restore trust in your body, and that can be translated to after the baby comes.”


Latasha Britton focuses on her balance during a prenatal yoga class at the Family Outreach Center while observed by Kim Bridi, a yoga therapist with Evans Yoga Room. 
Laura Levering / Fort Gordon Public Affairs Office Latasha Britton focuses on her balance during a prenatal yoga class at the Family Outreach Center while observed by Kim Bridi, a yoga therapist with Evans Yoga Room. Laura Levering / Fort Gordon Public Affairs Office Bridi teaches prenatal and postpartum yoga classes at the Family Outreach Center. Classes last 90 minutes and are free for anyone with a valid military ID card.

Research shows that yoga can reduce stress, anxiety, tension, and high blood pressure. It can also increase self-awareness, bonding with baby, and so much more.

“Prenatal yoga is really establishing trust and safety in their body … to help prevent postpartum depression, getting the physical body ready for labor, learning how to relax the pelvic floor muscles … the classes are designed for that,” Bridi said.

And anyone can do it; regardless of physical state.

“Yoga is not about stretching and exercise,” Bridi said. “The yoga part comes in when there is awareness, there is mindfulness, there’s breathing, and there’s attention to something larger than either yourself or something deeper in yourself.”

Latasha Britton, military spouse, is 31 weeks pregnant with her second child. Britton said she exercised regularly during the first trimester then stopped during the second semester due to a significant decrease in energy. She has since gotten her energy levels back up, prompting her to give prenatal yoga a try.

“I think it really helps prepare the muscles and everything for delivery and for carrying a baby with how it strengthens the core muscles,” Britton said.

Keeping safety top priority, Bridi watched Britton closely to ensure she was comfortable and not overexerting herself. She encourages Britton (and other clients) to not leave what they learn in the classroom and instead to practice it at home.

“Coming to a weekly class is great, but doing a little on your own – even if it’s only 10 minutes a day – is recommended,” Bridi said.

The NPSP begins its series of six postpartum yoga sessions today.

The next postpartum yoga classes will be held March 9, 16, 23, 30, and April 6. Classes are from 10-11:30 a.m. at the FOC.

Call (706) 791-5220 to register.

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