2018-02-09 / News Update

Warrior Adventure Quest combines fun and training

Laura Levering
Fort Gordon Public Affairs Office

Members of the 44th Signal Battalion take part Saturday in an afternoon of Warrior Adventure Quest — in this case, a few “colorful” sessions at Augusta Paintball, on Barton Chapel Road. Photos by Bill Bengtson / Fort Gordon Public Affairs Office Members of the 44th Signal Battalion take part Saturday in an afternoon of Warrior Adventure Quest — in this case, a few “colorful” sessions at Augusta Paintball, on Barton Chapel Road. Photos by Bill Bengtson / Fort Gordon Public Affairs Office In the military there is a time for training and there is a time for fun. Few programs intertwine the two like Warrior Adventure Quest.

Supported and endorsed by the Department of the Army, WAQ is a Soldier reintegration program that combines high adrenaline activity with resilience skills training. It is coordinated through Morale, Welfare and Recreation staff and facilities.

The program was originally intended to help lessen high risk behaviors common among Soldiers who have recently redeployed. WAQ has since expanded and can be tailored to accommodate the needs of each installation’s Servicemembers.

“It is teambuilding, resilience training, stress relief activity for active duty, Guard … it’s open to all service branches here,” said Lorrie Chadd, Fort Gordon WAQ program coordinator.


Preparing to dodge, duck and inflict paintballs is a 442nd Signal Battalion member in the midst of a Saturday Warrior Adventure Quest outing. Preparing to dodge, duck and inflict paintballs is a 442nd Signal Battalion member in the midst of a Saturday Warrior Adventure Quest outing. Chadd hosted a group of 67 Servicemembers from 442nd Signal Battalion’s Signal Basic Officer Leaders Course at Augusta Paintball on Saturday. They spent the afternoon grooming their skills while getting to know one another by shooting and dodging paintball pellets. They also had an opportunity to play archery tag.

Chadd said that although it may look and sound like fun and games on the surface, bringing units together for activities such as paintball is a good way for Servicemembers to have positive interaction in a different setting.

“A lot of these guys are working 24/7 shifts and they don’t get a lot of camaraderie time and stress relief time away from the job,” Chadd said. “This gives them a chance to get to know each other a little better outside the office, which will then translate into a better working relationship when they go to the office.”


Augusta Paintball plays host Saturday to a group of Fort Gordon representatives ducking, crawling, running and shooting their way through an afternoon of Warrior Adventure Quest. Augusta Paintball plays host Saturday to a group of Fort Gordon representatives ducking, crawling, running and shooting their way through an afternoon of Warrior Adventure Quest. To schedule an event, unit leaders contact Chadd and they make arrangements based on the number of people, time available, and mission they want to accomplish. Chadd has taken units skydiving, whitewater rafting, ziplining, indoor rock climbing, and more.

“Whether they want something super high adrenaline for a small group of people or something that everybody can participate in, I’ve got a lot to offer them,” Chadd said.

Funding for trips come from the DA, so there is no cost to the Servicemembers. Chadd recommends contacting her at least two weeks out from desired date, but the more advanced notice, the better. After arrangements are made, Chadd sends everything the unit needs to know in preparation for the event including an itinerary, guidelines for proper attire, and general “need to know” information.


Lorrie Chadd, a recreation specialist and program coordinator with the Directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation, pours out a packet of paintballs for use in a Saturday outing at Augusta Paintball, on Barton Chapel Road. Lorrie Chadd, a recreation specialist and program coordinator with the Directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation, pours out a packet of paintballs for use in a Saturday outing at Augusta Paintball, on Barton Chapel Road. Capt. Mendola Nash, instructor-writer for S-BOLC, said Chadd was very supportive of her request, especially during the brainstorming phase, to host hold an event for her class’s students.

“They’ve completed all of their academic instruction, so we thought we’d give them something fun to do before we transition,” Nash said. “This is kind of like a transition from the classroom into the tactical phase of the training.”

Entering her last couple weeks of training, 2nd Lt. Olivia Newcomb, of Central Valley, Calif., said she never pictured doing this type of training in the Army. Now she understands and appreciates it.

“I can see how it helps you build relationships with people outside of the work environment, and then that helps you in the work environment because then you’re probably more willing to approach them if you know that you can have a good time outside of work,” Newcomb said. “They might be somebody you can trust and talk to.”

“In building up team cohesion with all of the skills that they have learned, this will definitely contribute to the success of mission readiness,” Nash said.

Readiness: it is the Army’s top priority and WAQ is helping maintain it.

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