2018-02-09 / Front Page

Career Skills Program key in transition

Laura Levering
Fort Gordon Public Affairs Office


Antoinette C. Noble-Webb, Career Skills Program installation administrator, commits her time and resources to assisting Servicemembers. 
Laura Levering / Fort Gordon Public Affairs Office Antoinette C. Noble-Webb, Career Skills Program installation administrator, commits her time and resources to assisting Servicemembers. Laura Levering / Fort Gordon Public Affairs Office Whether they serve a few years or enough to retire, at some point every Servicemember will have to decide what they want to do following their military career.

It can be a daunting task, but there is an abundance of resources available to assist along the way. The Army’s Career Skills Program is one of them.

Established by Installation Management Command in 2015 as part of the Soldier for Life-Transition Assistance Program, CSP prepares Soldiers for civilian employment through apprenticeships, internships, job shadowing, on-the-job training, and employment skills training.

“When a Servicemember is transitioning out of the military, this is a part to help them get certifications or internships with companies so it’ll be easier transitioning to the civilian workforce,” said Antoinette C. Noble-Webb, Fort Gordon CSP installation administrator.

To be eligible, participants must have served at least 180 days on active duty and be within 180 days of being released.

They must also fulfill SFLTAP requirements and submit a Memorandum of Participation and DA Form 31 signed by their commander.

“That’s just so everyone knows where the person is,” Noble-Webb said. “Between me, the program manager, and the command, we should all know where the Servicemember is.”

Currently, there are 130 CSPs nationwide. Two of those programs are based on Fort Gordon but take place in Savannah: Veterans Education Training and Transitioning Program, which is run by Georgia Tech, and the Department of Energy Savannah River Operations internship. The DOE-SR is temporarily on hold.

Depending on location, Servicemembers may commute or stay on site for the duration of the program.

Permissive temporary duty to attend a CSP more than 50 miles away from the Servicemember’s duty station may be granted with commander’s discretion.

Fort Benning and Fort Stewart, Georgia, offer 13 programs (total), and Fort Jackson, South Carolina, have two.

Noble-Webb conducts briefings on a regular basis educating Servicemembers of their options with CSP.

She also works work one-onone with Servicemembers to learn about Servicemembers’ interests so she can match them up with a suitable program.

“When a Servicemember comes into my office, I ask them what they want to do,” Noble-Webb said. “I understand that you may be anxious, and if you’ve been in the military for 25 years and it’s all you’ve done … the program makes transitioning into civilian life a little easier.”

Under the CSP, Servicemembers have a chance to hone in on existing skills and develop new ones that can translate to a career in the civilian sector.

It is a win-win for the Servicemember and government because it doesn’t cost the Servicemember money to participate, and it increases the chances of a Servicemember being hired, which saves the government unemployment expenses.

“Our goal is for the Servicemembers to find gainful employment,” Noble-Webb said. “We’re here to provide a service to the Servicemember that is beneficial to them.

Anyone with questions should contact Noble-Webb at (706) 787-1767, or by stopping by Darling Hall, Room 262.

Return to top