2017-08-11 / Front Page

Every role is vital to law enforcement

BY LAURA LEVERING
Fort Gordon Public Affairs Office


David Garfield, police support assistant, Directorate of Emergency Services (right), reads the serial number from a weapon to Sgt. Ray Maillo, physical security officer, 35th Military Police Detachment. David Garfield, police support assistant, Directorate of Emergency Services (right), reads the serial number from a weapon to Sgt. Ray Maillo, physical security officer, 35th Military Police Detachment. They share one military occupational specialty and have different jobs, yet their underlying mission is the same. Staff Sgt. Angel Parker and Sgt. Ray Maillo are military police assigned to the 35th Military Police Detachment.

Parker has been an MP for almost 13 years; Maillo 10 years. Parker works at the Law Enforcement Center where she is a desk operations desk sergeant. Maillo works at Directorate of Emergency Services but his job as a physical security specialist requires he leave the building often. Maillo has been working in physical security for about eight months.

Their individual missions are unique, but the underlying mission is the same: to serve and protect.

Parker is often the first person someone sees when they enter the LEC. Her responsibilities include manning phone calls, maintaining a log of phone calls and walk-ins, overseeing police patrol paperwork, and managing an incident report (blotter).


Sgt. Ray Maillo, physical security officer, 35th Military Police Detachment, checks the serial numbers from weapons in the Directorate of Emergency Services arms room. 
PHOTO BY LAURA LEVERING / FORT GORDON PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE Sgt. Ray Maillo, physical security officer, 35th Military Police Detachment, checks the serial numbers from weapons in the Directorate of Emergency Services arms room. PHOTO BY LAURA LEVERING / FORT GORDON PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE She’s also in charge of the arms room where those on duty working force protection check out their weapons daily. And that’s just touching the surface of what desk operations handles.

“Anything that comes in through the installation, whether it’s an event going on or let’s say, we have an active shooter, we’re the base of operations for all of that,” Parker said. “It’s a tremendous amount, but I love what I do.”

As a physical security specialist, Maillo conducts security inspections, reviews and edits physical security plans, conducts site surveys on facilities and provides risk analysis on mission essential areas throughout the installation.


Staff Sgt. Angel Parker, desk operations desk sergeant, 35th Military Police Detachment, manages the front desk at the Law Enforcement Center. Staff Sgt. Angel Parker, desk operations desk sergeant, 35th Military Police Detachment, manages the front desk at the Law Enforcement Center. He then gives installation commanders and facility managers recommendations for security systems and measures they should implement as a result of his inspections.

“We’ll give a report of our findings and recommendations to the commanders, and they have a period to write in a formatted memorandum their corrections to the deficiencies that we find, and then we’ll come back out and re-inspect the facility to ensure that they’re to standard,” Maillo said.

Both Soldiers find aspects of their jobs challenging at times. For Parker, the biggest challenge has been getting used to Georgia law since leaving her previous duty station in Texas.

“We have to keep local and state laws in mind when working with the population because it changes with each state and every installation operates differently,” Parker said.

For Maillo, one of the biggest challenges is getting people to understand his job is to help and ensure safety; not to close down facilities.

“I’m here to assist in any way possible to ensure that they’re following all regulations and if they don’t … I let them know and I give them an opportunity to fix it,” Maillo said.

At the end of the day, both Soldiers said they find their work fulfilling and hope they’ve made a positive impact on the community.

“I feel like everything we do has a purpose, and if it’s done correctly and to the standard, then it can have great results,” Parker said.

Return to top